toudou

theselittlethingsaremine:

dishface:

A friend asked how I do this thing, so I decided to make a tutorial for it! FYI, this is Photoshop CS5. Hope it helps in some way! If there’s anything that completely confuses you, don’t hesitate to ask me. :) 

Here is a fullsize version.

(This font’s exclamation point looks too much like an “L,” so I apologize for sounding too excited in my tutorial.)

A little suggestion to make this feel more authentic would be to create a square brush with less opaque edges so that it has more depth of field to it :)

rurouni-panda

mattakumo-suke:

お絵描きメモです。

今まで絵を描いてて自分なりに感じた事、
わかった事をメモしたものをまとめました。
間違っている可能性もありますので、
鵜呑みにはしないでください。
×とあっても、あくまで私の感性、見解であり、
その表現を否定するものではありません。
どんな表現も人それぞれの個性だと思います。

maid-en-china

maid-en-china:

The second part of the cloud tutorial is done :D You can view the full version on my dA. And for the new followers, you can find part 1 here I’ll be working on part three next :3

Here’s the free download to the Photoshop brushes.

I was very happy to see all the beautiful skies people have been painting while using my tutorial :) I hope to make lots of other tutorials on lighting and colors as well. Now I just need time between my busy schedule orz…

_____________

-Full view of sample cloud paintings

-Gif of the tutorial work progress (best viewd in Firefox)

toudou

paintaloosa:

All right, here’s my contribution to the art tutorial infographic world, part 1 of 2.  I’ve noticed that even in professional illustration, so often the humans and environments and armor and whatnot is really, really great— correct anatomy, lighting, proportions, like ‘wow this is fantastic WAIT what is up with that HORSE?’

I suspect two things;

First is that I spend 15 hours a day, 365 days a year looking, touching, handling, and just generally being around horses.  

Second is that most people do not.  

Artists have lost touch with their connection to horses as contemporary society has lost touch with them.  Generally, we don’t have that constant presence of horses in our lives that previous generations did, as horses aren’t part of the everyday landscape any more.  They don’t work the fields, they don’t cart the goods, they don’t deliver the mail or transport you to the next town down the road.

However, we still see horses all the time— in movies, books, illustration, ads and logos, we are presented with the image of horses all the time.  So we assume ‘yes, I have seen horses often and I know what they look like.’  Because of our exposure, we as artists don’t always feel like we need to heavily reference the animals as if we were drawing something we don’t see everyday (say, like elephants or giraffes or sea cucumbers).  Our brain just kind of plugs in ‘horse shaped’ and we go with that.

And I suspect that ends up being where a lot of these common mistakes occur.  Dogs are familiar, but we can easily find a dog to draw from live, to see the way the shapes of its face are put together in 3-dimensions.  Cats, humans, birds… if we venture just a little ways outside our studios (or in some cases, inside), we can find live models to study easily.  

You can’t really do that with horses.  They’re a commodity, sequestered away behind fences on private farms and shuttered away in barns.   So few people really get the chance to be up close and have that hands-on experience to really learn how a horse is put together.

So here’s some things, based on my own experience both drawing and working with horses, that might help you if you find yourself needing to draw one for yourself.

The approach I took might be more complicated than absolutely necessary, but I tried to present the subject of ‘how to draw horses’ a little differently than I’ve seen it done before.  I hope someone finds it understandable, and more importantly, helpful!

If you share this, please don’t delete my commentary about it above. Thanks :3